Simple Crochet Stitch Dictionary

If you have looked at a variety of crochet patterns, you may have noticed that there are two different sets of crochet stitches in English language patterns. The strange thing is that the United Kingdom and the United States have each come up with their own set of stitches, but with very similar names.

But how do you tell if your crochet pattern is in US or UK crochet terms?

It can be very confusing if you don't know the difference. There are a few things to look out for when working out if you have a US or UK pattern. If the pattern or book you're working from has single crochets or half double crochets, then it's a US pattern. If it has half treble stitches, then it's a UK pattern. I would recommend becoming familiar with what each stitch looks like, and comparing the pattern with any supplied images to see if you can tell if your "double crochet" is a US double or a UK double, likewise with treble crochets. 

UK stitches are named after the number of "yarn overs" which you do while creating your stitch,
while US stitches are named after the number of times you pull the yarn through your stitch.

There are many more stitches which are used than I explain here, but hopefully more specialised stitches will be explained as part of the notes for the pattern you are following.

 
 

Chain

A chain is the same in both US and UK patterns. 


It is created by doing a Yarn Over, and then pulling the yarn through the loop on your hook. It is often used to start off some blankets or garments by creating enough chains to get to the required width or length. To start off a series of chains, create a slip knot on your hook, and then pull up a loop and you have a chain!

When counting your chains you count each little loop, but not the one which is on your hook.


slip stitch

A slip stitch is also the same in both US and UK patterns. It is the smallest of the stitches after the chain.

Insert your hook into the stitch in the row below, yarn over, and pull yarn through the stitch and the loop on your hook.


Single crochet (US) / double crochet (UK)

This stitch is the most common stitch used in amigurumi, although sometimes other stitches are used for a different effect.

To create this stitch, insert your hook into the stitch below, yarn over and pull the loop through the stitch, yarn over again, and pull through both loops on hook.

As you might be able to see, in the US it is named a single crochet because you pull through the loops on your hook once, or a single time. In the UK it is named a double crochet because you have the two loops on your hook.


half double crochet (US) / half treble crochet (UK)

This stitch is a shorter version of the double crochet (US) / treble crochet (UK). To create it yarn over, insert the hook into the stitch below, yarn over and pull up the loop through the stitch, and then yarn over and pull through all loops on the hook.

 


double crochet (US) / treble crochet (UK)

This is the stitch which you will see in your typical granny square.

To create it yarn over, insert the hook into the stitch below, yarn over and pull up the loop through the stitch, and then yarn over and pull through two loops on hook (two loops remain on hook), yarn over and pull through all loops on the hook.

 


treble crochet (Us) / double treble (uk)

This stitch is taller than a double crochet (US) / treble crochet (UK)

To create this stitch yarn over twice, insert the hook into the stitch below, yarn over and pull up the loop through the stitch, and then yarn over and pull through two loops on hook (three loops remain on hook), yarn over and pull through two loops again (two loops remain on hook), yarn over and pull through all loops on the hook.